One of the first emails I received when I went viral way back in April 2015 was from a woman claiming to work for Positive (I say claiming because she wasn’t using a Positive Singles email address). I don’t want to endorse a product I would never personally use. In a world where we are judged for having a sexually transmitted condition, telling a new partner about herpes means risking a rejection that plenty of herpes people would rather avoid. There is a market for these services, and I don’t want to dismiss the experiences of the people who use them. I don’t mean to knock the insecurities of people with herpes: I want to address the companies that profit off of them.It's ugly, but you can do everything else you could before, save for some precaution.

Herpes dating services have been around since the Internet was invented, thanks to a powerful social stigma that makes disclosing your STI status a frightening prospect for many of us.

It’s time to talk about herpes dating websites and how much I hate them.

My lady friend wanted to do something nice for me so she said she wanted to hook me up with one of her new friends.

Awesome I haven't been on a nice date in awhile so it could be a bit of fun.

Just no kissing or BJ's (like I even get those to begin with) during an... Unless there was an adamant belief that we would spend the rest of our lives together...

If you don't have it, why risk contracting it?

Like other dating services, they can be unsafe spaces for women where harassment and coercion thrive.

When you round up a vulnerable and isolated population, create a community space and fail to moderate it or protect your users, you create a dangerous environment.

A booming app industry in Silicon Valley means that new STI dating services pop up every few months, and a cursory Google search means that their marketing team, or their founder, or their intern, quickly discovers me. As time goes on and stigma lessens, there will be less of a demand for these services.