Even more constraining were Kelvin's estimates of the age of the Sun, which were based on estimates of its thermal output and a theory that the Sun obtains its energy from gravitational collapse; Kelvin estimated that the Sun is about 20 million years old.

Geologists such as Charles Lyell had trouble accepting such a short age for Earth.

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These had assumed that the original heat of the Earth and Sun had dissipated steadily into space, but radioactive decay meant that this heat had been continually replenished.

George Darwin and John Joly were the first to point this out, in 1903.

Their values were consistent with Thomson's calculations.

However, they assumed that the Sun was only glowing from the heat of its gravitational contraction.

Thus the age of the oldest terrestrial rock gives a minimum for the age of Earth, assuming that no rock has been intact for longer than the Earth itself.

In 1892, Thomson had been made Lord Kelvin in appreciation of his many scientific accomplishments.

Other naturalists used these hypotheses to construct a history of Earth, though their timelines were inexact as they did not know how long it took to lay down stratigraphic layers.

In 1830, geologist Charles Lyell, developing ideas found in James Hutton's works, popularized the concept that the features of Earth were in perpetual change, eroding and reforming continuously, and the rate of this change was roughly constant.

This was a challenge to the traditional view, which saw the history of Earth as static, He assumed that Earth had formed as a completely molten object, and determined the amount of time it would take for the near-surface temperature gradient to decrease to its present value.

His calculations did not account for heat produced via radioactive decay (a then unknown process) or, more significantly, convection inside the Earth, which allows the temperature in the upper mantle to remain high much longer, maintaining a high thermal gradient in the crust much longer.

Kelvin calculated the age of the Earth by using thermal gradients, and he arrived at an estimate of about 100 million years.