He apologized and said he had just gotten over chlamydia and wasn’t in a rush to gamble with his sexual health again.

dating with genital herpes-58dating with genital herpes-82

the statistics on how common genital herpes is, the math didn’t add up: If one in six people had it, how was I the only person I knew to do the ultimate walk of shame from the student health center clutching a stack of STD pamphlets?

Further Google searches opened my eyes to the powerful and invisible stigma associated with sexually transmitted diseases.

He felt less pressure to decide immediately whether or not he was comfortable proceeding, and I felt less like a freak asking someone to decide if sleeping with me was worth contracting an incurable illness.

As fate would have it, he quickly decided I was awesome, but I still didn’t quite feel like myself. I don’t know what made me decide enough was enough.

It helped to not have to look at him and watch as he processed the new information.

It was also easier for us to talk about herpes in the context of my general health, as opposed to our possible relationship.

But Andy and I were resourceful kids, and we weren't about to give up on two months of sexual tension.

Borrowing a trick from our teenage selves, we grabbed a blanket and hunted down a secluded enough corner of the campus softball field.

We had agreed to meet in the middle: the campus of our alma mater in Connecticut.

What we hadn’t anticipated was that because we weren’t students anymore, we didn’t exactly have a bed to call our own.

On a logical level I knew that getting an STD had nothing to do with my actions and didn't say anything about my character; it was simply luck of the draw.