The online audience lapped it up, perhaps hungry for a real musical experience that showcased real people playing real instruments.

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THANKS to da Cruz cousins Danny, Lina, Rif, Raimundo, Luzia, Helena, and Fafita; to Lund cousins Sandy and Betty Rae and to Minnesota historian Dana Yost, and the nice people of Minneota, Minneota; to ex-sisters-in-law Christine and Lori and ex-mother-in-law Consuelo. For Virginia, to George Gilmer, Russell Hill (son of Harry), and the late Jimmie Walker. Separate chapters (they load faster): [Mom and Norway] [Dad] [Grandmother Gus and Germans/Swiss] [Grandfather Daniel and Portugal] [Brother Dennis] [Uncle Pete] [The Scotts] [Frankfurt Germany] [Army] [Pam] [SEE THE ONLINE FAMILY TREE] Note to posterity: The online tree referenced just above was built at familyecho.com, a site which will surely disappear one day.

The public read-only version is stored in my Columbia University "personal Web" space (columbia.edu/~fdc/), which also won't last forever.

Moving comfortably from mellow to blasting to soft and pleading, Whitley proved herself a formidable front-woman.

In addition to showing her incredible vocal chops, she also showed her musical versatility, bashing along with Blade on her own drumkit, playing a keyboard, strumming a guitar, or providing vocal back-up at points.

With her black suspenders, white t-shirt and fitted black trousers, with blonde hair neatly tied back in a pony tail, she cut a stylish, strong figure reminiscent of rock feminist icons like Patti Smith or Debbie Harry in her early Blondie days.

Lanois, in knit cap and low-slung jeans, played a few of his own hits, including a grinding, guitar-heavy version of "The Maker" with a shuffle-beat percussive undertow courtesy of Blade, and Lanois' own effects-laden guitar work lending a virtuosic, woozy counterpoint to Whitely's acidly sharp backing vocals.

The zipper of comments that ran along the side of the live feed was filled with impatience, excitement, and even a few hilarious observations from people in the Bowery's capacity audience (ie: "I can't see who's in the VIP section.

Granny's eyesight is bad here.") Watching the mix of images and reactions, there was, I felt, an truly intimate quality to this kind of live event; with just a cozy room to play in and a friendly crowd sharing thoughts and reactions in real time to Vollick's every close-up and wide pan, it was the kind of communal, creatively connected experience that nicely reflected the band's ethos."Surely" by Black Dub As for sound, trying to categorize Black Dub's music is no easy task.

Whether steaming through blues-influenced numbers like "Silverado", the gospel-meets-blues hip-swaying meditation of "Nomad Knows", or the earthy, 21st century psychedelia of "Ring The Alarm", one was continually reminded (whether via rimshots, timbres, key changes, well-placed pauses, or a combination therein) of the magical chemistry at work between these accomplished individuals.