What really matters are how the couple will grow and change over time; how they will deal with adversity and relationship conflicts; and the specific dynamics of their interactions with one another—none of which can be measured via personality tests.

users’ compatibility with one another, leading people to believe that others were either a 30%, 60%, or 90% match.

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Of those who were still married, the couples that met online reported marital satisfaction than those who met offline.

These results remained statistically significant, even after controlling for year of marriage, gender, age, ethnicity, income, education, religion, and employment status.

The homosexual couples in the survey were more likely to have met online, and naturally, less likely to have gotten married, given that, at least at the time that data were collected, they could not legally do so in most states.

The data set used in that paper is publicly available, and my own re-analysis of it confirmed that if the analysis had controlled for sexual orientation, there would be The statistics behind the finding that the couples that met online were more likely to break up do hold up to scrutiny, but these results are certainly not the last word given the small sample of only 280 couples that met online, as compared to more than 6,000 in the study by Cacioppo and colleagues.

According to Finkel, one of the main problems with the match-making algorithms is that they rely primarily on similarity (e.g., both people are extroverts) and complementarity (e.g., one person is dominant and the other is submissive) to match people.

But research actually shows that personality trait compatibility does not play a major role in the eventual happiness of couples.

The word "Zoosk" with sleek letters in a gentle light blue color.

The middle letter "o" is connected above to a heart symbol.

Many people continue to see it as a last refuge for desperate people who can’t get a date “in real life.” Many couples that meet online are aware of this stigma and, if they enter into a serious relationship, may create false cover stories about how they met.

This choice may play a role in perpetuating this myth because many happy and successful couples that met online don’t share that information with others.

First, the finding that couples that meet online are less likely to get married is based on an inaccurate interpretation of the data.